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Revision #2 to TR21-139 | 4th April 2022 19:16

Punctured Low-Bias Codes Behave Like Random Linear Codes

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Revision #2
Authors: Venkatesan Guruswami, Jonathan Mosheiff
Accepted on: 4th April 2022 19:16
Downloads: 60
Keywords: 


Abstract:

Random linear codes are a workhorse in coding theory, and are used to show the existence of codes with the best known or even near-optimal trade-offs in many noise models. However, they have little structure besides linearity, and are not amenable to tractable error-correction algorithms.

In this work, we prove a general derandomization result applicable to random linear codes. Namely, in settings where the coding-theoretic property of interest is "local" (in the sense of forbidding certain bad configurations involving few vectors---code distance and list-decodability being notable examples), one can replace random linear codes (RLCs) with a significantly derandomized variant with essentially no loss in parameters. Specifically, instead of randomly sampling coordinates of the (long) Hadamard code (which is an equivalent way to describe RLCs), one can randomly sample coordinates of any code with low bias. Over large alphabets, the low bias requirement can be weakened to just large distance. Furthermore, large distance suffices even with a small alphabet in order to match the current best known bounds for RLC list-decodability.

In particular, by virtue of our result, all current (and future) achievability bounds for list-decodability of random linear codes extend automatically to random puncturings of any low-bias (or large alphabet) "mother" code. We also show that our punctured codes emulate the behavior of RLCs on stochastic channels, thus giving a derandomization of RLCs in the context of achieving Shannon capacity as well. Thus, we have a randomness-efficient way to sample codes achieving capacity in both worst-case and stochastic settings that can further inherit algebraic or other algorithmically useful structural properties of the mother code.



Changes to previous version:

Retracted claim from previous version about Reed-Solomon codes achieving list-decoding capacity.


Revision #1 to TR21-139 | 8th November 2021 21:54

Punctured Large Distance Codes, and Many Reed-Solomon Codes, Achieve List-Decoding Capacity





Revision #1
Authors: Venkatesan Guruswami, Jonathan Mosheiff
Accepted on: 8th November 2021 21:54
Downloads: 141
Keywords: 


Abstract:

We prove the existence of Reed-Solomon codes of any desired rate $R \in (0,1)$ that are combinatorially list-decodable up to a radius approaching $1-R$, which is the information-theoretic limit. This is established by starting with the full-length $[q,k]_q$ Reed-Solomon code over a field $\mathbb{F}_q$ that is polynomially larger than the desired dimension $k$, and "puncturing" it by including $k/R$ randomly chosen codeword positions.

Our puncturing result is more general and applies to any code with large minimum distance: we show that a random rate $R$ puncturing of an $\mathbb{F}_q$-linear "mother" code whose relative distance is close enough to $1-1/q$ is list-decodable up to a radius approaching the $q$-ary list-decoding capacity bound $h_q^{-1}(1-R)$. In fact, for large $q$, or under a stronger assumption of low-bias of the mother-code, we prove that the threshold rate for list-decodability with a specific list-size (and more generally, any "local" property) of the random puncturing approaches that of fully random linear codes. Thus, all current (and future) list-decodability bounds shown for random linear codes extend automatically to random puncturings of any low-bias (or large alphabet) code. This can be viewed as a general derandomization result applicable to random linear codes.

To obtain our conclusion about Reed-Solomon codes, we establish some hashing properties of field trace maps that allow us to reduce the list-decodability of RS codes to its associated trace (dual-BCH) code, and then apply our puncturing theorem to the latter. Our approach implies, essentially for free, optimal rate list-recoverability of punctured RS codes as well.


Paper:

TR21-139 | 24th September 2021 05:43

Punctured Large Distance Codes, and Many Reed-Solomon Codes, Achieve List-Decoding Capacity


Abstract:

We prove the existence of Reed-Solomon codes of any desired rate $R \in (0,1)$ that are combinatorially list-decodable up to a radius approaching $1-R$, which is the information-theoretic limit. This is established by starting with the full-length $[q,k]_q$ Reed-Solomon code over a field $\mathbb{F}_q$ that is polynomially larger than the desired dimension $k$, and "puncturing" it by including $k/R$ randomly chosen codeword positions.

Our puncturing result is more general and applies to any code with large minimum distance: we show that a random rate $R$ puncturing of an $\mathbb{F}_q$-linear "mother" code whose relative distance is close enough to $1-1/q$ is list-decodable up to a radius approaching the $q$-ary list-decoding capacity bound $h_q^{-1}(1-R)$. In fact, for large $q$, or under a stronger assumption of low-bias of the mother-code, we prove that the threshold rate for list-decodability with a specific list-size (and more generally, any "local" property) of the random puncturing approaches that of fully random linear codes. Thus, all current (and future) list-decodability bounds shown for random linear codes extend automatically to random puncturings of any low-bias (or large alphabet) code. This can be viewed as a general derandomization result applicable to random linear codes.

To obtain our conclusion about Reed-Solomon codes, we establish some hashing properties of field trace maps that allow us to reduce the list-decodability of RS codes to its associated trace (dual-BCH) code, and then apply our puncturing theorem to the latter. Our approach implies, essentially for free, optimal rate list-recoverability of punctured RS codes as well.



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